Cheyna Roth


Before becoming the newest Capitol reporter for the Michigan Public Radio Network, Cheyna Roth was an attorney. She spent her days fighting it out in court as an assistant prosecuting attorney for Ionia County. Eventually, Cheyna took her investigative and interview skills and moved on to journalism. She got her masters at Michigan State University and was a documentary filmmaker, podcaster, and freelance writer before finding her home with NPR. 
 
Very soon after joining MPRN, Cheyna started covering the 2016 presidential election, chasing after Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and all their surrogates as they duked it out for Michigan. Cheyna also focuses on the Legislature and criminal justice issues for MPRN. 
 
Cheyna is obsessively curious, a passionate storyteller, and an occasional backpacker. 
 
Follow her on Twitter at @Cheyna_R
 

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Soon minors in Michigan will no longer be able to use e-cigarettes. Governor Gretchen Whitmer signed bills Tuesday that effectively ban vaping for minors.

In a statement, Whitmer said she signed the bills with “significant reservations.”

That’s because the new laws would not put e-cigarettes under the umbrella of Michigan’s tobacco control laws. Instead the laws create new categories for e-cigarettes and products.

Cheyna Roth / Michigan Public Radio Network

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Opening statements and first witnesses were called Thursday in the criminal trial of the former dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine at Michigan State University. 

Michigan Public Radio Network’s Cheyna Roth was in the courtroom for the case of People versus William Strampel.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   A jury has been selected in the criminal trial of William Strampel. He’s the former dean of Osteopathic Medicine at Michigan State University. 

Opening statements in the case will begin Thursday.

Attorneys took the morning and into part of the afternoon on Wednesday to pick the people who will decide if William Strampel is guilty or not of the charges against him.

GRAND RAPIDS, MI (MPRN)--   State Representative Larry Inman (R-Grand Traverse County) was in federal court Tuesday for an arraignment on multiple criminal charges.

Chris Cooke, Inman’s attorney, told the federal magistrate that his client is not guilty of the three crimes he’s charged with. The charges include attempted extortion – which carries a maximum sentence of up to 20 years in prison. He’s also charged with soliciting a bribe and lying to the FBI.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   The future of a ballot-signature law passed last year is unclear. 

Wednesday Attorney General Dana Nessel said that parts of the law that add requirements to the ballot signature process are unconstitutional. Now Republican lawmakers - and others - are working on their next steps.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey says he’s waiting to see if Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson actually follows through on the order before deciding what to do.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Some bills in the state Legislature would expand who can administer life-saving drugs in the event of an opioid overdose. 

The legislation would allow government agencies – and their employees – to administer opioid antagonists. Commonly called Narcan, it’s an emergency overdose medication.

This would open the door for public agencies – like libraries and schools – to have Narcan on hand in the event an employee sees someone suffering from an overdose.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Controversial bills to outlaw a certain type of abortion procedure are scheduled for a state House committee hearing this week. 

The bills would ban the “dilation and evacuation” or D-and-E procedure. The bill has been moving steadily through the state House. That’s despite a likely veto by Governor Gretchen Whitmer.

Republican Senator Tom Barrett sponsored similar legislation in the state Senate. He says he’ll keep fighting for this ban despite Governor Whitmer saying she’ll veto anti-abortion bills.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   A state Senate committee approved a budget provision to financially penalize communities with sanctuary city policies. 

The committee passed a corrections budget Wednesday. It added language to the budget that would withhold jail dollars for communities that enact or enforce policies that prevents law enforcement from cooperating with federal officials on immigration matters. 

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Republican lawmakers have filed an appeal to the United State Supreme Court in a lawsuit that accuses them of unconstitutional gerrymandering. 

Last week a federal court said that the Legislature and governor must agree on new political district lines for Congressional and state elections by August.

Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey (SHUR’-key) says he’s in the initial stages of carrying out the order.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Michigan students may not get any additional snow days forgiven this year.

The state Senate unanimously passed a bill Tuesday that would have forgiven four state declared emergency snow days. But after that vote, several Democrats voted to not give the bill immediate effect. It’s a procedural move which renders the bill useless because it would not take effect until well after the school year has ended.

Pages