Cheyna Roth


Before becoming the newest Capitol reporter for the Michigan Public Radio Network, Cheyna Roth was an attorney. She spent her days fighting it out in court as an assistant prosecuting attorney for Ionia County. Eventually, Cheyna took her investigative and interview skills and moved on to journalism. She got her masters at Michigan State University and was a documentary filmmaker, podcaster, and freelance writer before finding her home with NPR. 
 
Very soon after joining MPRN, Cheyna started covering the 2016 presidential election, chasing after Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and all their surrogates as they duked it out for Michigan. Cheyna also focuses on the Legislature and criminal justice issues for MPRN. 
 
Cheyna is obsessively curious, a passionate storyteller, and an occasional backpacker. 
 
Follow her on Twitter at @Cheyna_R
 

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   The Michigan Supreme Court is unsure if it can weigh in on the method used to change Michigan’s minimum wage and earned sick time laws, and it wants Attorney General Dana Nessel to weigh in. 

Last year the state Legislature adopted two ballot measures. The measures increased the state’s minimum wage and required certain employers offer paid earned sick time.

The Republican-led Legislature quickly made major changes to those measures in the same Legislative session. That brought up the question of whether that “adopt and amend” move was okay.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   People elected to tribal offices are exempt from a portion of the Michigan Constitution that involves who can run for state and local offices. 

The Michigan Supreme Court issued an opinion Monday.

The constitution says that if a person is convicted of a felony involving dishonesty or fraud, and that stems from their position in state, local or federal government, then that person can’t run for another elective office in Michigan. The court said in its opinion that tribes do not count as “local governments.”

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   The Michigan Supreme Court says the Legislature should look into a state statute that may conflict with the legal age of sexual consent.

The Michigan Public Radio Network’s Cheyna Roth says the conflict involves the age of consent. The overarching criminal statute says the age of consent in Michigan is 16, but a separate statute criminalizing child sexually abusive activity and child sexually abusive material prohibits certain sexual acts involving a minor. It defines minor as a person under 18 years old.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Michigan schools will finalize their budgets Monday – but without knowing how much money they’ll have to work with.

It’s the start of the new fiscal year for school districts, and that means that schools in Michigan need to know now how much money they are going to use throughout the year, but lawmakers in Lansing have yet to give them a clear picture of what they can expect their budgets to be.

Republican Representative Aaron Miller is chair of a subcommittee focused on education spending. He says this situation has happened in the past.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel wants a court to shut down an oil and natural gas liquids pipeline that runs under the Straits of Mackinac. Nessel says the line is a potential hazard to the Great Lakes.

There had been talks between Governor Gretchen Whitmer and Enbridge about a plan designed by the previous administration. That plan would build a new section of Line 5 and put it in a multi-use tunnel under the bedrock of the Straits.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Right to Life of Michigan is kicking off its canvassing efforts Wednesday. 

The group will start collecting signatures for ballot initiative. It would ban an abortion procedure known as dilation and evacuation, or D&E. The procedure is most commonly used in the second trimester. The measure would make it a crime for doctors to perform the procedure, unless the life of the mother was at risk.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Governor Gretchen Whitmer says she’s angry with the Republican-led state Legislature. 

That’s because it won’t be holding a session for the next two weeks – and it hasn’t finalized the budget.

“No one in Michigan, no one in any other field is allowed to go on a vacation until they get their work done. They’re expected to work and stay at the job until they’ve gotten their work done. That’s exactly what we need to demand of our leaders in Lansing as well,” she says.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Governor Gretchen Whitmer has signed a spending bill worth more than $28 million.

The money will be distributed to a variety of areas. That includes funding for implementing parts of the new Lead and Copper Rule for drinking water. The $3 million for the Lead and Copper Rule will be used for things like water filters and drinking water investigations in homes.

The money is also being used for the Double Up Food Bucks program and the state’s Wrongful Imprisonment Compensation fund.

Cheyna Roth / Michigan Public Radio Network

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Education advocates – from teachers to lunch staff – filled the state Capitol lawn Tuesday. 

The state school aid budget is still being worked out by lawmakers in the Legislature, but protesters at the Capitol want to make sure that the final product has enough money for K-12 schools.

Donna Jackson is the president of a Detroit union that represents paraprofessionals – or school staff. She says she wants the Legislature to adopt Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s spending plan. And the half billion dollars in additional money it calls for.

LANSING, MI (AP)--   All remaining criminal charges of city and state officials stemming from the Flint Water Crisis have been dismissed. 

The investigation was started by former Attorney General, Bill Schuette in 2016 after lead contaminated Flint’s drinking water when the city switched its water sources. Earlier this year, new AG Dana Nessel created the Flint Water Crisis prosecution team to handle the multiple pending cases and investigation going forward.

Pages