Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

Updated August 19, 2021 at 7:29 AM ET

The biographies of top Taliban leaders are vague for a reason: secrecy has often been the key to survival.

Take the one-eyed cleric who founded the movement, Mullah Mohammad Omar. After a U.S.-led invasion toppled his government, he was on the run for years, hunted relentlessly by American forces. Omar reportedly died in 2013 in either Afghanistan or in neighboring Pakistan, but his death was not even publicly confirmed for another two years.

Updated August 18, 2021 at 3:27 PM ET

COVID-19 booster shots of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are set to become available for all U.S. adults beginning next month, the country's top health officials announced Wednesday.

"Kabul was a bit better compared to yesterday," said a journalist based in Afghanistan's capital city who sent a message to NPR on Tuesday.

For the person's protection, we are not naming the journalist, who said there were signs suggesting a gradual return to some semblance of normalcy two days after the Taliban launched a lightning assault on Kabul, forcing out the U.S.-backed Afghan government.

Updated August 16, 2021 at 5:08 PM ET

Search and rescue teams are pulling people from collapsed buildings in Haiti as international aid efforts ramped up in the hardest hit areas in the Caribbean nation's southwest after a devastating earthquake.

As of late Monday afternoon, officials said the death toll had risen to 1,419 and some 6,000 reportedly are injured. The magnitude 7.2 earthquake that struck early Saturday is the deadliest one to hit the country, the poorest in the Western Hemisphere, since January 2010.

Updated August 15, 2021 at 5:51 PM ET

Twenty years after being removed from power in a U.S.-led invasion, Taliban militiamen swept to into Afghanistan's capital, Kabul, on Sunday, facing little resistance from Afghan government forces.

Within hours, Afghanistan's Washington-backed president had left the country and the flag at the U.S. Embassy had been lowered amid a hasty evacuation of diplomatic personnel.

Updated August 15, 2021 at 12:39 PM ET

Helicopters evacuating Americans from Kabul as the Taliban closed in was a scene being likened to the 1975 fall of Saigon in the wake of the U.S. withdrawal from Vietnam.

The first live Asian giant "murder hornet" of 2021 has been spotted in Washington state — and it was caught in the act of living up to its name, attacking a wasp nest.

Tropical Depression Fred, currently off the coast of Cuba, is forecast to slowly regain tropical storm status before bringing strong winds and potentially heavy rainfall to Florida this weekend.

Fred is expected to move through the southeastern Bahamas on Thursday, pass over central Cuba on Friday and make landfall as a tropical storm in the vicinity of the Florida Keys by Saturday. Another landfall is likely in Florida's Big Bend region, south of Tallahassee, or the Panhandle over the weekend or early next week, forecasters say.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the chief medical adviser to President Biden, says an additional COVID-19 vaccine dose is needed for people who have compromised immune systems.

China doesn't want patrons at tens of thousands of karaoke venues across the country to belt out subversive lyrics — and they are cracking down to make sure that it stops.

The country's Ministry of Culture and Tourism says it will create a blacklist of songs containing "illegal content" at karaoke establishments starting Oct. 1, according to the state-run Xinhua news agency.

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