Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

West Virginia Wesleyan College won't require students to be vaccinated against COVID-19 when they arrive for classes this month — but the small Christian liberal arts school says it will charge a hefty $750 fee for anyone who hasn't received at least a first shot.

The private college, which has about 1,500 students, says that about 90% of faculty and staff and "a large percentage of students" have already been vaccinated.

Arkansas, among the states hardest-hit by a new wave of coronavirus cases linked to the highly contagious delta variant, says it is down to eight unoccupied ICU beds statewide with which to care for COVID-19 patients.

Gov. Asa Hutchison, in a tweet on Monday, said the latest report highlighted "startling numbers."

It seems there's no way to escape advertising these days — and at first blush, news that a Canadian company has contracted SpaceX to put a billboard into low-Earth orbit would appear to end any debate to the contrary.

Speedskater-turned-baseball infielder Eddie Alvarez is about to do what only two other Americans have ever accomplished — win medals at both the Summer and Winter Olympics.

At the Sochi Winter Games in 2014, the Cuban-American athlete won silver as part of the U.S. 5,000-meter relay team. Following Thursday's U.S. 7-2 victory in baseball over defending Olympic champions South Korea, he'll medal again when the U.S. faces Japan on Saturday. The only question is whether his new medal will be silver or gold.

United Airlines has told its 67,000 U.S.-based employees that they will need to be inoculated against COVID-19 by late October to stay on the job.

Citing "incredibly compelling" evidence that the vaccines are safe and effective, United CEO Scott Kirby announced the policy change on Friday. He said he understood that some employees would disagree with the mandate, according to The Associated Press.

Two coaches from the Belarus team have been dismissed by the International Olympic Committee four days after they ordered sprinter Kristina Timanovskaya back home for publicly criticizing them.

The IOC revoked credentials for Artur Shimak and Yury Maisevich. They "were requested to leave the Olympic Village immediately and have done so," the IOC said.

The White House is granting Hong Kong residents who are in the U.S. temporary "safe haven," letting them remain and work in the country for at least 18 months without fear of deportation.

The move, announced Thursday, comes in response to China's imposition of a national security law in Hong Kong that severely curbs free speech and the right to protest guaranteed by the agreement that handed back the city to Beijing in 1997 after a century of British rule.

Updated August 16, 2021 at 9:29 AM ET

With the Taliban now back in full control of Afghanistan two decades after being ousted in a U.S.-led invasion, experts are fearful for the country's future.

In recent weeks, the insurgents seem to have followed much the same script as they did in 1996: a methodical push to capture the countryside, followed by a final blitz on the capital.

In a dramatic move reminiscent of the first days of the coronavirus in China some 19 months ago, flights and trains in and out of Wuhan have been halted amid a rise in COVID-19 cases linked to the highly infectious delta variant of the virus.

Authorities have also ordered mass testing in the city of 11 million, where the virus was first detected before it spread around the world. Panic-buying by worried residents followed new lockdowns there.

More than a year and a half after the coronavirus was first detected in China — followed by the world's first big wave of COVID-19 — the country is again battling to stem the spread of new cases attributed to the more infectious delta variant of the virus.

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