Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

Despite living through one of the most politically and racially divisive eras in U.S. history, the youngest of voting-age Americans — especially those of color —appear more hopeful about the country's future than they were four years ago, a new poll released Friday finds.

The Harvard Youth Poll of 2,513 Americans between the ages of 18 and 29 conducted from March 9 to March 22, found them expressing significantly more optimism than in the months after Donald Trump became president.

Updated April 23, 2021 at 4:37 PM ET

The U.S. is joining an international search for a missing Indonesian submarine that lost contact with its base earlier this week. Authorities said the KRI Nanggala 402, if still intact, may by now have exhausted its oxygen supply for its crew of 53.

Pentagon spokesperson John Kirby announced Thursday evening on Twitter that at Indonesia's request, the U.S. was "sending airborne assets to assist in the search for the missing submarine."

Updated April 23, 2021 at 9:34 AM ET

Russian jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny said Friday he is calling off a more than three-week prison hunger strike that doctors say left him near death.

Russia says it will begin a phased reduction of troops from its border with neighboring Ukraine – apparently ending a deployment that had alarmed Kyiv and Western observers concerned about a possible repeat of Moscow's 2014 annexation of Crimea.

After making the first powered flight on another world, NASA's Mars 2020 mission has managed another key first that could pave the way for future astronauts by making breathable oxygen out of the wispy Martian air.

Rescuers scouring the Bali Sea for a stricken Indonesian submarine with 53 sailors aboard are hoping the crew could still be alive, but as the hours since the vessel's disappearance tick by, the chances of survival grow increasingly slim.

Governors from a dozen states are asking President Biden to ban the sale of cars and light trucks that emit greenhouse gases by 2035.

In a letter to the president, the governors of California, New York, North Carolina and nine other states — all but one a Democrat — asked for the change ahead of a White House climate summit, scheduled to begin Thursday.

Indonesia's navy has lost contact with a submarine carrying 53 sailors that was preparing for a weapons training exercise in waters north of Bali, a military spokesman said Wednesday.

The German-built KRI Nanggala-402, which went into service in the early 1980s, failed to relay results of the exercise as expected, Julius Widjojono said, according to Reuters.

Indonesia's defense ministry said that an aerial search had spotted an oil slick on the water near where the submarine is thought to have performed a dive.

The European Union's drug regulator said Tuesday it had concluded there is a "possible link" between the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine and several cases in the U.S. of a rare type of blood clot, but emphasized that the shot's benefits "in preventing COVID-19 outweigh the risks of side effects."

Idriss Déby Itno, the president of Chad and one of Africa's longest-serving leaders, was killed in the country's north, where he had traveled to observe the fight against rebel insurgents, state media reported Tuesday.

The announcement came just hours after election officials in Chad certified that Déby, 68, had carried nearly 80% of the vote in April 11 polls, setting him up for a sixth five-year term as president.

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