Tamara Keith

President Trump is racing from tarmac to tarmac in the final weeks of the campaign, holding large rallies to blast out an array of closing arguments — buckshot style — for a second term in office.

So far, most of the stops have been in swing states — Florida, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Arizona, Wisconsin, Michigan and Nevada. But he has also held rallies in Iowa and Georgia, states he won easily in 2016 in a sign the electoral map has shifted on him.

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When the last Chevy Cruze rolled off the line at the General Motors Lordstown assembly plant in March 2019, Bill Janik was there.

"If you saw the sign that said 'the last Cruze,' I made it and I hung it on the car," he said.

Janik worked at the plant for 17 years before it shut down. His wife had been there for 25 years.

Over the course of a few years, GM Lordstown went from employing 4,500 people to essentially none.

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Now let's turn to Ohio. It's a state that President Trump won easily in 2016, and it is in toss-up territory this year. The closure of an auto plant there is looming large. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith visited the site of the former plant.

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The White House is struggling on Monday to show that it has a burgeoning public health and political crisis under control as President Trump enters his third day of aggressive and experimental treatment for the coronavirus.

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Justin Clark's path to the top of the Trump campaign started in an unlikely place: 20 years ago, between college and law school, Clark did accounting work for Democrat Al Gore's presidential campaign.

Republican candidate George W. Bush ended up winning that election, after legal battles over the recount in Florida went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Updated at 6 p.m. ET

Democrats go into the final weeks of the presidential campaign with a cash advantage.

As of the beginning of this month, former Vice President Joe Biden's campaign, combined with the Democratic Party, had about $30 million more in the bank than President Trump's reelection effort and the Republican Party, according to campaign finance filings made public Sunday evening.

Updated at 7:28 p.m. ET

Judges Amy Coney Barrett, Barbara Lagoa and Allison Jones Rushing are emerging as serious contenders to fill the seat on the Supreme Court vacated by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, according to sources familiar with the process.

An announcement on the nominee could come as early as Monday or Tuesday.

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