adopt and amend

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   The Michigan Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday on whether it was legal for the state Legislature to adopt citizen-led ballot initiatives last year, then quickly change them. 

State Solicitor General Fadwa Hammoud argued against the “adopt and amend” move. She said the Legislature thwarted the will of the people who signed the initiatives.

“This would create a permanent escape route for the Legislature, for the people to never get their voice through initiative power.”

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Lawyers from the state Attorney General’s Office will be in front of the Michigan Supreme Court Wednesday. The twist? They’ll be arguing both sides of the same issue. 

The Attorney General’s office says this move is part of its dual role. The office represents both the people of Michigan as well as the state.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   The Michigan Supreme Court is unsure if it can weigh in on the method used to change Michigan’s minimum wage and earned sick time laws, and it wants Attorney General Dana Nessel to weigh in. 

Last year the state Legislature adopted two ballot measures. The measures increased the state’s minimum wage and required certain employers offer paid earned sick time.

The Republican-led Legislature quickly made major changes to those measures in the same Legislative session. That brought up the question of whether that “adopt and amend” move was okay.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   State lawmakers want to go to the Michigan Supreme Court to find out if something they did in their last session is legal.

Attorney General Dana Nessel is considering a request for a formal opinion. Some Democratic lawmakers want to know whether the Republican-led Legislature’s adopt and amend tactic used last year is okay. Lawmakers adopted two ballot proposals – then made major changes to them – instead of letting voters decide.

Representative Triston Cole (R-Mancelona) introduced a measure to ask the state Supreme Court for its opinion.