Michigan Public Radio Network

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   The Michigan Supreme Court will decide whether to take a case to determine whether it’s ever appropriate for state money to go to private and parochial schools.

Michigan public school groups and the ACLU are challenging budget bills that were approved by Republican legislatures and then-Governor Rick Snyder. They allow a small amount of money to reimburse private schools for some expenses.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   A technology upgrade that’s supposed to help consumers threatens to shut down the system for keeping track of felons and sex offenders who’ve been released from prison.

Electronic tethers that keep track of offenders could go dark at the end of the year.

The state Corrections Department keeps track of 4,600 offenders using electronic tethers.

Chris Gautz is with the department. He says the tethers are attached to Verizon’s 3-G network that’s supposed to go dark at the end of the year, to be replaced by the 4-G network.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Governor Gretchen Whitmer has signed a spending bill worth more than $28 million.

The money will be distributed to a variety of areas. That includes funding for implementing parts of the new Lead and Copper Rule for drinking water. The $3 million for the Lead and Copper Rule will be used for things like water filters and drinking water investigations in homes.

The money is also being used for the Double Up Food Bucks program and the state’s Wrongful Imprisonment Compensation fund.

Cheyna Roth / Michigan Public Radio Network

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Education advocates – from teachers to lunch staff – filled the state Capitol lawn Tuesday. 

The state school aid budget is still being worked out by lawmakers in the Legislature, but protesters at the Capitol want to make sure that the final product has enough money for K-12 schools.

Donna Jackson is the president of a Detroit union that represents paraprofessionals – or school staff. She says she wants the Legislature to adopt Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s spending plan. And the half billion dollars in additional money it calls for.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   State Attorney General Dana Nessel says a state commission is not bound by a formal opinion that prevents investigations into LGBTQ discrimination. 

Last year then-Attorney General Bill Schuette issued an opinion. It said that the Michigan Civil Rights Commission could not interpret the Elliott Larsen Civil Rights Act to include sexual orientation and gender identity protections.

DNR warns of electrocution on water-swollen lakes

Jun 19, 2019

INTERLOCHEN, MI (MPRN)--   The Michigan Department of Natural Resources says current high water levels increase the risk of electric shock drowning. 

Interlochen Public Radio’s Dan Wanschura reports that’s when a person comes into contact with an electric current in the water.

That electric current is caused by faulty or exposed wiring from boats and docks.

Things like frayed electrical cords or household extension cords that aren’t meant for use on the water.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Governor Gretchen Whitmer has announced more than $1 million will go to hospitals to help create better systems for treating people with opioid addiction.

The governor says reducing opioid abuse is a top priority of her administration.

Whitmer says opioid addiction is a large and growing problem. She says one reason is people end up at emergency rooms after they overdose, but they are often released without a follow-up plan.

LANSING, MI (AP)--   All remaining criminal charges of city and state officials stemming from the Flint Water Crisis have been dismissed. 

The investigation was started by former Attorney General, Bill Schuette in 2016 after lead contaminated Flint’s drinking water when the city switched its water sources. Earlier this year, new AG Dana Nessel created the Flint Water Crisis prosecution team to handle the multiple pending cases and investigation going forward.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Governor Gretchen Whitmer says money and political clout are at stake in the upcoming US Census. She says Michigan stands to lose a great deal if everyone doesn’t participate.

Michigan’s lost five congressional seats since the 1980s due to fewer people counted by the Census bureau. That’s meant less political influence in Washington. The census also helps determine federal funding for health care, schools and roads.

housedems.com

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Some Michigan lawmakers are trying – once again – to pass legislation that would require elected officials to file financial disclosures. It’s an issue that lawmakers have been trying to get past the finish line for decades. 

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