Michigan Supreme Court

LANSING, MI (AP)--   Court clerks around Michigan are criticizing a proposal to allow phones and other electronic devices in courthouses.

Among their objections: They fear they’ll lose money.

The Michigan Supreme Court is holding a public hearing Wednesday in Lansing.

Courts typically charge people to make copies of public documents. Someone with an electronic device could do it for free. For example, Mason County charges $1 per page. Clerk Cheryl Kelly says the proposed rule “would put a dent in our revenue.”

DETROIT (AP) — A lawyer is warning that local governments in Michigan could face a financial calamity if forced to repay surplus cash from the sale of tax-foreclosed properties. The Michigan Supreme Court heard arguments Thursday over a law that allows treasurers to keep any surplus after overdue property taxes are paid from a property sale. Christina Martin, an attorney for two people in Oakland County, calls it "stealing." But John Bursch, arguing for Oakland County, says lawmakers can always change the law.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Governor Gretchen Whitmer is asking the Michigan Supreme Court to reinstate her emergency ban on the sale of flavored vaping products in Michigan.  

A motion asks the state Supreme Court to bypass lower courts and immediately consider the case. The Whitmer administration’s filing says the matter is urgent because of the risk to public health – it says candy- and popcorn-flavored vaping products are attractive to young consumers who could easily become hooked on nicotine.

MARQUETTE, MI--   Northern Michigan University will be the final stop for Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel and Michigan Supreme Court Justice Megan Cavanagh on their statewide listening tour about elder abuse.

The meetings have been held to identify issues facing Michigan seniors to better guide the Attorney General’s Elder Abuse Task Force.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   The Michigan Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday on whether it was legal for the state Legislature to adopt citizen-led ballot initiatives last year, then quickly change them. 

State Solicitor General Fadwa Hammoud argued against the “adopt and amend” move. She said the Legislature thwarted the will of the people who signed the initiatives.

“This would create a permanent escape route for the Legislature, for the people to never get their voice through initiative power.”

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   Lawyers from the state Attorney General’s Office will be in front of the Michigan Supreme Court Wednesday. The twist? They’ll be arguing both sides of the same issue. 

The Attorney General’s office says this move is part of its dual role. The office represents both the people of Michigan as well as the state.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   The Michigan Supreme Court says prosecutors in criminal cases cannot rely on experts to testify on how often children typically lie or tell the truth about sex abuse. 

The court says juries were swayed by opinions, not the facts, in two individual cases. It ruled that sexual abuse trials are not credibility contests where juries determine who is most likely telling the truth.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   The Michigan Supreme Court is unsure if it can weigh in on the method used to change Michigan’s minimum wage and earned sick time laws, and it wants Attorney General Dana Nessel to weigh in. 

Last year the state Legislature adopted two ballot measures. The measures increased the state’s minimum wage and required certain employers offer paid earned sick time.

The Republican-led Legislature quickly made major changes to those measures in the same Legislative session. That brought up the question of whether that “adopt and amend” move was okay.

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   People elected to tribal offices are exempt from a portion of the Michigan Constitution that involves who can run for state and local offices. 

The Michigan Supreme Court issued an opinion Monday.

The constitution says that if a person is convicted of a felony involving dishonesty or fraud, and that stems from their position in state, local or federal government, then that person can’t run for another elective office in Michigan. The court said in its opinion that tribes do not count as “local governments.”

LANSING, MI (MPRN)--   The Michigan Supreme Court says the Legislature should look into a state statute that may conflict with the legal age of sexual consent.

The Michigan Public Radio Network’s Cheyna Roth says the conflict involves the age of consent. The overarching criminal statute says the age of consent in Michigan is 16, but a separate statute criminalizing child sexually abusive activity and child sexually abusive material prohibits certain sexual acts involving a minor. It defines minor as a person under 18 years old.

Pages