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Michigan tribe awarded grant for e-cigarette education

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MARQUETTE, MI (AP)--   An Upper Peninsula nonprofit organization is supporting a program that educates young people in the Hannahville Indian Community about the dangers of e-cigarettes.

The Marquette-based Superior Health Foundation awarded an $11,518 grant to the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan for the Anishinaabe E-cigarette and JUUL Health Education Project.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the use of e-cigarettes is unsafe for children and young adults.

Health educator Kelly Hansen of the Hannahville Indian Community says JUUL products also pose risks. JUUL is a battery-powered e-cigarette that generates a nicotine-laced aerosol.

Hansen says the tribal project will use a curriculum called “Catch my Breath” to provide teachers, parents and health professionals with information about e-cigarettes and help children make wise choices.

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