Hansi Lo Wang

Hansi Lo Wang (he/him) is a national correspondent for NPR reporting on the people, power and money behind the U.S. census.

Wang was the first journalist to uncover plans by former President Donald Trump's administration to end 2020 census counting early.

Wang's coverage of the administration's failed push for a census citizenship question earned him the American Statistical Association's Excellence in Statistical Reporting Award. He received a National Headliner Award for his reporting from the remote village in Alaska where the 2020 count officially began.

With multiple investigations still underway, attorneys involved with the tax fraud case against former President Donald Trump's family business and its longtime chief financial officer, Allen Weisselberg, are due back in court Monday for a hearing in New York City.

Updated September 14, 2021 at 12:22 PM ET

An independent panel of researchers said it has found no major irregularities in the 2020 census results that were used to reallocate congressional seats and Electoral College votes for the next decade.

Updated September 4, 2021 at 1:32 PM ET

President Biden plans to visit New York and New Jersey on Tuesday to survey the damage wrought when remnants of Hurricane Ida struck several states in the Northeast with ferocity this week, thrashing the region several days after making landfall on the Gulf Coast.

For about 1 in 10 people counted for last year's U.S. census, a single check box was not enough to report their racial identities.

Their multifaceted responses to the race question for the 2020 head count helped produce the data released this month for redrawing voting maps, enforcing civil rights laws and guiding federal funds to local communities.

Some news coverage of the latest 2020 census results may have led you to think the white population in the U.S. is shrinking or in decline.

The actual story about the country's biggest racial group is more complicated than that.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Over the past decade, the United States continued to grow more racially and ethnically diverse, according to the results of last year's national head count that the U.S. Census Bureau released this week.

There are many ways to slice the data and change how the demographic snapshot looks.

A new portrait of the racial and ethnic makeup of the U.S. is set to be unveiled Thursday when the Census Bureau releases the largest trove of results from the 2020 count so far.

The basic demographic information about how the country's residents self-identify will be used to redraw voting districts, enforce antidiscrimination laws and inform research and policymaking for the next decade.

After months of delays, the 2020 census results used to redraw voting districts around the country will finally be released on Aug. 12, the U.S. Census Bureau said Thursday.

President Biden's White House is reviving a previously stalled review of proposed policy changes that could allow the Census Bureau to ask about people's race and ethnicity in a radical new way in time for the 2030 head count, NPR has learned.

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